The I Am [Dot. Dot. Dot.] Podcast

Ep# 31 I Am...Wanting to Start a Podcast [beginner podcasting tips for you]

May 11, 2024 Kristen Werner & Mia Steel
Ep# 31 I Am...Wanting to Start a Podcast [beginner podcasting tips for you]
The I Am [Dot. Dot. Dot.] Podcast
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The I Am [Dot. Dot. Dot.] Podcast
Ep# 31 I Am...Wanting to Start a Podcast [beginner podcasting tips for you]
May 11, 2024
Kristen Werner & Mia Steel

Embarking on a podcasting voyage can seem daunting, but we, Kristen and Mia, have your back.

Grab your headphones, a cuppa and some paper as we go give you the lowdown on starting your very own podcast.

With a sprinkle of personal anecdotes, we cover why this medium is the perfect fit for busy creators and how it magnificently aligns with our human design. We also get real about the authentic connections we've fostered and how diving into the podcasting space can enrich both your personal and business landscapes.

Who knew recording in a closet could lead to such sound clarity? This episode strips away the complexities of podcasting, guiding you through the essentials of microphone selection, whether you're eyeing the Yeti or Rode, and the beauty of starting with the basics. We also delve into the wonders of AI in enhancing audio post-production and navigating the sea of hosting platforms. From Buzzsprout's charming AI co-host feature to the steps for connecting with Apple Podcasts, we've laid out a treasure map for your podcasting journey.

To wrap up, we take a candid turn with an open chat about menstrual discs versus traditional products, and the joys and trials of our daily lives. Whether you're a seasoned content creator or just dipping your toes in the podcast pool, our tales of meal prep triumphs and technology gripes are sure to resonate.

We're here to remind you that, amidst the busyness of life, your voice has a place in the podcasting world—so let's get started and grow together.

START UGC RIGHT HERE ➡️ UGC Accelerator Course

➡️ UNLEASH Free Bootcamp: Be the FIRST to hear about our next One jump on the waitlist now.

FOLLOW ALONG WITH US:
Instagram: @‌hivehubcollective
TikTok: @‌hivehubcollective

Join Hundreds of Creators in our Essential Content Creator Mini Course HERE

Products we love to Share [affiliate Links]


Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Embarking on a podcasting voyage can seem daunting, but we, Kristen and Mia, have your back.

Grab your headphones, a cuppa and some paper as we go give you the lowdown on starting your very own podcast.

With a sprinkle of personal anecdotes, we cover why this medium is the perfect fit for busy creators and how it magnificently aligns with our human design. We also get real about the authentic connections we've fostered and how diving into the podcasting space can enrich both your personal and business landscapes.

Who knew recording in a closet could lead to such sound clarity? This episode strips away the complexities of podcasting, guiding you through the essentials of microphone selection, whether you're eyeing the Yeti or Rode, and the beauty of starting with the basics. We also delve into the wonders of AI in enhancing audio post-production and navigating the sea of hosting platforms. From Buzzsprout's charming AI co-host feature to the steps for connecting with Apple Podcasts, we've laid out a treasure map for your podcasting journey.

To wrap up, we take a candid turn with an open chat about menstrual discs versus traditional products, and the joys and trials of our daily lives. Whether you're a seasoned content creator or just dipping your toes in the podcast pool, our tales of meal prep triumphs and technology gripes are sure to resonate.

We're here to remind you that, amidst the busyness of life, your voice has a place in the podcasting world—so let's get started and grow together.

START UGC RIGHT HERE ➡️ UGC Accelerator Course

➡️ UNLEASH Free Bootcamp: Be the FIRST to hear about our next One jump on the waitlist now.

FOLLOW ALONG WITH US:
Instagram: @‌hivehubcollective
TikTok: @‌hivehubcollective

Join Hundreds of Creators in our Essential Content Creator Mini Course HERE

Products we love to Share [affiliate Links]


Speaker 1:

Welcome to the. I Am.

Speaker 2:

Dot Dot Dot podcast the podcast for busy mums who want to consume useful shit for their biz and their life. Here we tackle the things we know are holding mums and women back in their business.

Speaker 1:

We're not afraid to tackle the big shit, the bullshit and the good shit. We go from mum guilt to confidently learning how to kick ass in this digital space.

Speaker 2:

We will discuss the world of digital marketing and share life's tips and tricks for getting it done.

Speaker 1:

As six-figure business owners with over 10 years of digital marketing and brand experience, and mums to young kids, we get it, we share it and we own it. So buckle up and let's go. Let's go, let's go. I think we've got it. I think we got off the screen, I know. Hey, welcome to the I am dot dot dot podcast, the podcast for busy creators who want to consume useful shit for their biz and their life. I'm Kristen Werner, joined by Mia Steele. What up? Hello?

Speaker 2:

hello, how's it going? We're running on 4G today.

Speaker 1:

So we love a little bit of go and buy the most expensive kind of stuff you can get to run your computer. It's cool, I buy it. And then it's like doesn't work on 5Gs and we've just changed to 4Gs. It's like that's where we're at. It's where we're at bitches.

Speaker 1:

Yep 2024 still sitting on 4G, but I love it that like everything's working better, like we've only like been for a week just glitching like, and now I've gone back to some 4G. It's like, yeah, guys, we just want to roll with. I'm an 84 baby. Maybe it's just meant to be now. Mia, what are we going to be talking about today? How are you feeling? What's going on? You know? Start a podcast.

Speaker 2:

I am wanting to start a podcast, so today's episode is all about that, and it's kind of weird because we're a podcast. So today's episode is all about that, and it's kind of weird because we're a podcast teaching you how to do this too. But we frigging love a podcast. Now, before I met Kristen, I was just hell bent on TikTok. That's all I did TikTok, tiktok. And when we started this business, she's like oh, let's start a podcast.

Speaker 2:

I'm like whoa right okay, and we did um, we did that um what do you call it? Bloody mastermind with a vet mayor. And it turns out that podcasting is part of our human design. And once we started podcasting, I was like, wait a minute, I like this. This is not only easier because you can have a whole entire conversation, you just. You don't have to squeeze everything into like a minute 50 on TikTok, and people can get to know you, they buckle in, they sit down, they listen to you, they get to know your personality. And another great thing is you can record your podcast with video and chop it up to lots of little clips and spread it all over your socials as well. So thank you for getting me into podcasting, because I frigging love it.

Speaker 1:

Stop, but I'm going to take it.

Speaker 1:

Look, I don't mind to chat if y'all haven't figured that out, and I've actually forgotten. I don't know how I'd forgotten that, yvette, actually, when we went through the Frequency Project, how she said that, like, as she's explaining the human designs and she's going through Mia's process and everything, it's like, oh yeah, you know your human design and lines and all that you know, podcasting is a medium for you. And then she said that for me. And then she like looked at both of us and she was like so you guys and we're like we were just planning a podcast, and she was like, yeah, that's definitely what you need to be doing, yeah, doing. And so that was obviously absolutely a line for us and I did love it.

Speaker 2:

How when I said it to Mia and she was like what?

Speaker 1:

I was like nah, mate, trust me. So thanks for trusting me. And I think the other part of it not pushing you to do a podcast, but like wanting to do a podcast is the Slack channel conversations we have are ridiculous and the amount of times we spend hours on a Slack channel and we're like we could turn this into cracking content. Some you probs won't want to hear, um, although we're thinking of starting another, another section to share with you each week, but we're going to keep that one secret till we actually do it, because we need some more lulls in our life. Uh, but the other part of it was every single kind of content creator, every single kind of content creator, every single larger course that I've ever invested in like high ticket, really invested my time, energy and money into it, has been somebody that I've been listening to their podcast. I've spent time in their world. I've got to know them, got to trust them to a point where it just made sense to be like well, of course I'll invest in you.

Speaker 1:

Like it happened with Amy Porterfield I bought her, um, her digital course Academy. It happened with Judson star. It happened with James Wedmore. It happened with Yvette Meyer. Like I remember Yvette, I saw her. She was doing um, she was in the mums with hustle community and I remember seeing her and then I listened to her podcast and I think I binged six or seven episodes in a podcast. Then I sent her a voice DM because I was like I feel like you're in my head and then she was like I've got this program and it just kind of snowballed from there and so when Mia and I thought we'd start a podcast, we wanted to be that support system for you, that somebody that you can feel like we get what you're in, we get what you're doing. We want to make this simple for you. So it's such an incredible platform to speak to your audience and get to know them because, like it's, the most intimate thing that you can do as a content creator is get inside somebody's head. I think that's the really cool part.

Speaker 2:

Podcast is such a great way to get to know. You know someone that you're perhaps going to buy something from, but you're not really sure. And then next minute you know you're listening to all their podcasts and you feel like you know them as a person and also for the people doing the podcast. When you think about your target audience like for us it's mums trying to start a digital business and sometimes sitting down, you've got the kids around. You can't sit and watch a whole entire YouTube video, but you can put the podcast on and have it playing in the background, playing in the car on the way to school. So you really got to think about how your target audience are consuming content as well.

Speaker 1:

And that's so true Because, like for me, for example, I put my AirPods in and I put one AirPod in with a podcast on while I'm cooking dinner, while I'm cleaning, working with the kids, doing whatever. Even sometimes my husband's like can you even hear me? I'm like mate, it's just like a radio, but I can carry it around instead of a radio that's playing in the lounge room and I'm folding socks in the bedroom Like, just get over it. Like clearly just a man thing he's like. But how can you possibly do more than one thing at once? Do things at once, I just can. And a little fun fact that I got to share with you all on the podcast which will just blow your socks off, is that research suggests that 52% of podcast listeners listen to podcasts while driving, 42% while exercising and 40% while doing housework and chores and things like that. So if you think about your audience, you've got potentially, like for us, for example, if I take mine, I will be listening to. That's why I love listening to a podcast and I have different podcasts for different moods. Like heading into the weekend, I'll put on the podcast. It's like no-brainer Don't care, just wants to consume stuff that my brain can be like blah my potato. And then during the week when we're in work mode, it's like James Wedmore and all those people mainly just James Wedmore's podcast that I listened to, cause I'm like, okay, I need to get inspiration and excitement and value from what I'm listening to. So really think about that.

Speaker 1:

If you're thinking of starting a podcast and if you haven't thought about one, well, hopefully this is the podcast that can get that ticking over. And if you have thought about one, you're like, okay, we're going to give you some some not tool, yeah, some tools. I was going to say rules, you do what you want. We're going to give you some suggestions and outlines of, if you're thinking of starting a podcast, the things that you might need, the things to consider, the platforms that you can use, and there's going to be a little PDF that you can download from this particular podcast episode. And then there's going to be a whole masterclass that will be running inside the Hive Hub Collective, our membership where we're actually going to talk to our members through this process, which also allows them to be able to ask us questions if they're starting a podcast and all that kind of stuff. So anything in those show notes we've got affiliate links to things, different platforms and software that we use, so if you want to use any of them, feel free to do that. We've had except for today with our small just delays in the internet really enjoyed the platforms that we've been using, so we're going to share them with you today.

Speaker 1:

So I suppose the most important things that kind of Mia you outlined and let's go over that is like, when it comes to starting a podcast, what are the kind of things that people should consider? Like, if someone's listening right now, what are the things that we would say that you need to consider before starting this medium? Because there's two things just before we get into that and it's a stat that I heard don't know where I heard it from, but I'm going to deliver it to you that most podcasts like something like 90% of podcasts, 50 is the amount of episodes that most people do, and then they burn out and they stop and then that's it. And so if you pass that kind of, I think it's it's definitely 50.

Speaker 1:

Cause the other day we got to 30 and I was like, oh, this is, this is like we're over 30. This is good, we're going, we're getting there If you can get over that magic 50 mark, then your podcast is probably going to keep continuing on and adding benefit and growing and growing and growing. So just think of that in terms of, and when you think of that, you kind of go 50, oh my God, how am I going to do that? We're going to step you through how you can do that because much easier than you think and it's something that if you really are committed to your audience and growing your business and you're curious about podcasting, we can definitely say it's something that we have absolutely loved and our audience seem to love as well.

Speaker 2:

And I mean, if you're just beginning in this space and you know I had this feeling at the beginning too like it's almost when you hear the word starting a podcast, it feels a little bit overwhelming. You're like, well geez, I don't know if I can do that. But once you get into it and you start doing it and you know you set up there's a little bit of techie things that you've got to set up it's actually not that overwhelming and I'm starting to really enjoy doing the podcast, more so than posting on TikTok. I get more out of it. More so than posting on TikTok, I get more out of it. You know it's more valuable to our audience and it's really not as overwhelming as you think.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and that goes for you know you might be thinking, well, that's great, you guys have got each other to start a podcast. Like it might not be that easy for me. I've started podcasts two other podcasts on my own prior to this and it's something that it just you just really need to. It probably gets you helping you in this content creation space anyway, where you know you're creating TikToks, you're just talking to your phone. Well, it's the same kind of thing and if you understand your ideal customer and you can kind of imagine who they are and you imagine you're talking to them when you're doing your podcast and you're having a conversation with them, then creating a podcast becomes easier. So it's still easy enough to do on your own.

Speaker 1:

Or you might want to invite guests and have guests on your podcast Like you can decide that as you grow. But it's not something that it's too overwhelming if it's just you Sometimes. Sometimes that's easier because it's just you like. Okay, I feel like I say I'm going to punch out one, two, three, whatever, or it's. It just takes that little bit of planning, but it's all really, really worth it in the long run. So what's the kind of first podcast planning steps that we can talk people through Mia.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so it's really important to define your podcast niche and your target audience. Now, there are a lot of podcasts that you know have quite a broad target audience, but if you're really wanting to grow a loyal, engaged audience that listens to your podcast religiously, you need to know who they are, what they're thinking about, how they consume content, what they want to learn about, what are they doing. So, like in anything with business, defining that niche in your target audience is super important.

Speaker 1:

And they're all things that you know we work through inside the Hive Hub Collective. They're all things that if you're creating a digital product or something like that, then you'll get to know those things. You'll get to know the problem that your audience are having and the solution is you're providing a solution with what you're creating the podcast anyway. So you're talking through the different parts of business to help somebody with whatever problem they've got. And that's where you align with understanding your niche market and your target audience. So the other thing that in order to get your ideas out and to start to really think about, I mean you can obviously turn to potentially chat GPT and inquire and ask this is my target audience. Obviously, give the right prompts. This is my niche market, this is my target audience. This is the problem I'm solving. I'm creating a podcast.

Speaker 1:

It runs every single week, and just give ChatGPT as much information as you can about your brand and then say can you please give me I don't know 10 topic ideas and just start from there.

Speaker 1:

If that's a way to get your brain thinking, it just gives you enough to go oh, that's a really great idea. And then it's. It's about stepping out the point of the podcast and the way that you would talk through the podcast and things like that. So getting those ideas all comes from planning out who your target market is, who your audience is, the problem you solve and why you actually want to start a podcast. Cause that's what's going to give you the longevity, because sometimes the whole starting a podcast is exciting, the thought of it is exciting, but it becomes part of your business. There are podcasts that have got three, four, five hundred episodes, that have been going for years pre the podcast boom, that are only now kind of seeing the benefits of that time. So a podcast is a long-term content investment but it's a hugely rewarding investment and a hugely rewarding return on time and money investment for your business as you grow your community and as you build the trust within that community. So that's where it becomes such a wonderful platform to start.

Speaker 2:

And we'll talk a bit later on how you can, what you can do to your podcast too, because it's such great content that you can put in a lot of different places. You might think, oh, how's anyone going to find me on Spotify with my little podcast? But we'll talk about how you can sort of get the word out there for your podcast too. And just touching on planning as well, I mean for us, like we don't plan our podcasts months and months ahead of time, where responders you know each week we'll have a chat about what we want to talk about in the podcast. We're responding to things that have happened in our business or that we can see happening or what we think people might like to hear about in that week.

Speaker 2:

So don't feel like you have to. You know, plan 50 episodes all at once. Yeah, get the feel of it. And you know, each week you might think of something new that you didn't plan at all and it'll just. You know, it'll be one of your best ones, like a lot of our great podcasts where you haven't planned at all and it's been amazing.

Speaker 1:

So, and I think that's such like you've nailed that one there in terms of sometimes we've gone like, okay, this week let's talk about this. And then we've got on there like, well, that's boring, let's fucking just chat. And the podcast is so much better because you've also got to be in the mood, like your audience knows you're in their ear, they know if you're enjoying the content or not, they know if this lights you up or not. So you do have to also go into it thinking, okay, well, this week I plan to talk about I don't know email marketing. And then Mia and I get there and we're like, well, that's just fucking boring, today I'm not in the mood for that. Cool, let's chat about something else. And so, yeah, like you're saying, mia, that's really good in terms of, yes, going with a plan, but at the same time, you need to feel it too, because you want to engage with your audience and make them feel something, like any of your branding and any of your marketing. You want somebody to feel something.

Speaker 1:

So, um, the other thing that I know stops people, um, in this process, and the biggest questions that I have always seen in the podcasting space, the questions that I had when I first started was like, okay, what equipment do I need? Like what do I need to start a podcast? What microphone do I need? Like what do I need to start a podcast? What microphone do I need? And so you spend like forever on Amazon and all that just looking for the perfect podcast mic. Now, there's so many out there. You can spend anything from less than a hundred dollars all the way to two, three, four, $500. And it really comes down to again your budget and what you want this for. So I started off with a Yeti mic, which was really good.

Speaker 1:

It worked fine. I was quite happy with it. Mia and I then both had a Yeti mic. And then we just I don't know why we decided that wasn't for us in the end. It just there was something about it that just didn't. I don't know. It didn't feel right. Was it the sound quality, or did we just?

Speaker 2:

go. Yeah, the sound was a little bit off. Um, and you know, you know, road is quite a good brand, well-known brand in the um podcasting arena, and I think we had some money coming into the business. So we thought, you know, bugger it. Let's just, you know, treat ourselves and and get a road. So but I think I remember listening to one of your old podcasts on your uh, secret bright br Brides Club and you said, oh yeah, I was just in my closet at home and I used to just do my podcasts in the car and like, so it's not like you need a big studio with a big microphone, all set up perfectly in the beginning.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely do not. I used to spend a lot of time in the closet, lol, and I used to just surround myself with all my clothes and put my little computer in there and my little mic and I was happy as a bee. Yeah, so it doesn't matter about, like, the podcast recording studio and things like that, and I reckon that might've been maybe why we went against the Yeti and more towards something like the road, because we both figured that we didn't really have the perfect podcasting studio. Like when it was just me by myself, it was fine to take my, my laptop. I'd go into my clothes closet, it was beautiful and, um, the sound was amazing, because you want the less sound uh waves to bounce off things. So you do really want that kind of nice, beautiful sound, but you and I don't have that opportunity right now. We don't have a podcasting studio. Maybe one day we will, um.

Speaker 1:

So we needed to find a microphone that for us would do that, and the Rode has been such an incredible one. It's just a USB one that plugs into the Mac. Second, we plugged it in. It worked. There's less buttons, there's less everything, it just plugs in and it works. So for us I think that was probably more the reason why we went with the Rode. So you really do need to do a bit of your own personal research. But anything in the road space, they're brilliant microphones.

Speaker 1:

I think this one was about $250 or $290. So certainly not the cheapest, and you can get cheaper, but also not the most expensive. So you need to weigh that up in terms of A it's a business expense and B what this will bring to your business. So if you're just starting out, absolutely don't need to start at that point. You just you can start anywhere from, I think some of them around 30 to $50. To be brutally honest with you, when I started the secret brides club podcast, I started it with one of the programs software we will talk to you about called anchor. It was a free one. I used to have my headphones from my phone my Apple headphones plugged into my phone and I recorded it in my closet as well, straight to that and that was it, and it wasn't that bad Like. Was it perfect? Absolutely not, but I'm here for imperfect actions all the way.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and I think that was the thing is. I just needed to start. Yeah, and so many people do let equipment stop them. So you know, and what we've noticed in the software that we're going to share with you today, the AI around what it does to perfect your audio, is incredible. So sometimes those things don't even matter. So stay tuned for as we unfold them. So, yeah, we talked microphones. What other equipment shall we list out that people should consider in this process?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so next we've got headphones out that people should consider in this process. Yeah, so next we've got headphones. Now Kristen's wearing some little.

Speaker 1:

Are they Apple headphones or you know?

Speaker 2:

nothing fancy at all Plug in, pod kind of things. I don't have any headphones on at the minute. Sometimes I'll wear my big Sony ones, if you know, just to cut out some noise around me, but they're not. It's not really necessary to have headphones If you ask me. It's not going to change the sound or anything, it's just you know what you prefer. If you like to, you know, get that crisp sound inside your ears or not, especially if you're talking to someone else on your podcast, um, as a guest, um, but yeah, it's a take, I think.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, sometimes it's a feedback thing, sometimes it's a personal preference, but it's not necessary by any means. But yeah, mine is and it just plugs into the Rode microphone and so that feeds back to me and the I hear you through them as well, which is all through the Rode. So that's all part of the setup, which is pretty simple. When you purchase a microphone, it's going to tell you how to set that up or YouTube it, because it's all on there.

Speaker 2:

So that's not a necessity by any means, and certainly don't go out thinking you need the best of the best, you need some or you need none. Not the end of the world Recording software. I'll let you take this one, because you've tried a fair few different ones. But yeah, you're going to need some recording software.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, Recording software is again something that shouldn't stop you. So there's free options, there's paid options, there's some free, some paid, all the things. So basically, when it comes to recording a podcast, you need to get the soundbites, you need to get the MP3s, which is what is we're talking right now. Right Now we're doing a video, so we've also got that component in a software that we use. But basically, anything from, if you're on a Mac, GarageBand is a great one that you can record straight into if you're not looking for video. So if you're wanting to start a podcast and you don't want to get into the video side of things yet, absolutely fine. If we're just talking audio, then definitely something like GarageBand. Excuse me, I haven't personally used GarageBand, but it's one that if you've got an Apple computer, it's a great option.

Speaker 1:

The other one that I've used is called Audacity. Now, that is a software that you can get just by Googling the old Audacity. It's a I've downloaded, I think, so it's on my computer and it's a really simple, and then I did some YouTubes about how to use it. I don't use it to the best of its ability because I didn't need to. I bought the good mic. I just wanted to record my podcast. I wanted to get it done. So Audacity is a great free platform as well, just for audio. And the other thing that with Audacity and we'll show this inside certainly the masterclass inside the community is how to create like the intro with the music and the audio. Again, you can YouTube all this stuff and find out how to do that. But all I did was got the free music and then overlaid the introduction that we used in Audacity. So that's how I mixed those two together. So sometimes you just got to play with the software, test it, try it, see how it works, do some YouTubing and that's the best way to do it. So that's the free software, the other one.

Speaker 1:

So then if you want to go video and audio, your first option could be Zoom. There's nothing wrong with Zoom. It's probably not the best because there's so many great podcasting platforms now. But you know what, If that's all you've got to start, start there. We've done a lot of podcasts with people who just use Zoom. There's absolutely nothing wrong. You know, what does work better than maybe some of these podcasting platforms is that the video. It's like having a normal conversation where we found with some of the other podcasting software that we'll share you in a minute got a bit glitchy and then you didn't know what they were saying, and it was just really uncomfortable when you're talking to someone else.

Speaker 2:

Yes, yes, it gets a little bit hard when it's glitching and you're having a conversation with someone. Definitely, yeah, and just with Zoom too, I think it's only 40 minutes that you get on the free version, so you'd have to sort of keep your podcast within that 40 minutes. But you can always edit two Zooms together to make one big one.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, there's so many ways around it that you can start the podcasting process for basically free. So other software that we would recommend, that we have tried and tested one is Riverside. Now you may have heard of Riverside as a platform that you could use. Riverside is something that we tried at start. It works really well for editing. It works really well for everything that we wanted to do. We're like Riverside's awesome. There's a free option and then there's a paid version. The only thing that we didn't enjoy personally about Riverside is the fact that even with good internet like today, we're having a real ballser of a day. Let me tell you. I'm about to call Telstra and have a little word to them.

Speaker 1:

But even with good internet, we both found that Riverside it delayed, and so Mia would say something, and then I'd be like what? And so we just kind of had this. We got to a point where we can read each other a bit better. So I was like, okay, it's kind of she's, um, stopped moving on the video, but she's still talking. I can still pick up where.

Speaker 1:

If we had a guest that's taken their time out of their day to come on our podcast and we don't, we can't really have a cohesive conversation. I was like, oh, that's not cool, um, so that was why we turned away from Riverside to start with. But it's a great platform, there's nothing wrong with it. But that was just a personal preference. We turned to Podcastle. Now, podcastle so far has been fantastic.

Speaker 1:

There's a few little things that we'd make improvements on that. We've sent some suggestions to let me tell you. We're taking it all on board. Yes, suggestions too, let me tell you. But in terms of recording with multiple people, a group of people having a fluent conversation, we absolutely love it. I think it's absolutely fantastic. Chopping down into little clips has been fantastic. Creating whole YouTube versions with the recordings has been fantastic. Just doing the audio has been great. The the other thing with something like podcast I know riverside do it as well, but we'll talk podcast because we're speaking about them right now is the ai software that they've got is incredible some of them it does the editing for you.

Speaker 1:

I personally don't like that because, again, it's me and I having a conversation and I haven't. It hasn't quite got our um, kind of conversation flow. But if you were doing it by yourself, absolutely you could get it to do that editing and it hasn't quite got our kind of conversation flow. But if you were doing it by yourself, absolutely you could get it to do that editing for you. It takes out sound echoes, it improves the sound quality, like with a magic AI dust, so it's got some really incredible features. So we've loved using that particular software. So they are our kind of top softwares that we'd say they're all free. I think Podcastle and Riverside start once you start paying. I think Podcastle is about $15 a month, up to say $25, and Riverside is about the same. But they do have a free option that you can do, say, maybe in an hour or two a week's podcast, or maybe it's a month. Please go and look that up yourself. But that's what we've really enjoyed about using those platforms. So they are recording podcast platforms, yes.

Speaker 2:

And I've heard podcasts. The back end is really easy to edit and stuff. It's very straightforward, very basic, very visual. So, yeah, I've enjoyed the back end there.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and when it comes to editing, for example, we've got our intro and outro. That has been created that's what something we'll actually speak about in a minute, creating your intro but we've got those two soundbites with the music behind them pre-recorded and they're saved in a file. So when we edit podcasts or we edit our podcast and then we can drag those intros and outros and move the sound around so it overlays and stuff like that inside podcast, and then we download that whole file from podcast so as an audio file, so that can all be done in there, which is really really quite great. Terms of recording the intro, mia, like what do you think? We took a few turns and a few kind of I don't know ways of doing it, but what would you recommend for an intro people create as their little soundbite at the very start and or end.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I think it's got to be something fun and catchy and almost like, as soon as you hear it, you know, oh, I'm listening to I am dot dot dot podcast, because I know a lot of intros. As soon as I hear the music I'm like, oh, I'm listening to that person. So make it catchy, upbeat or sort of in line with your branding and who you're talking to, and it's just got to be something that I don't know catches people's attention. I know a lot of intros on some podcasts. They're so long and I feel like I have to like fast forward, frigging three minutes just to get to the actual podcast. So keep it short but catchy and memorable 30 to maybe 60 seconds.

Speaker 1:

I probably wouldn't go any more than a minute, cause like you say it does, you don't want it to drag on, you just want that reminder.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and also when you're getting a little bit better in that space as well, you know you might have some sponsors. So you know you do ads at the start or in the middle, and if it's at the start and you've got a big long intro and then you're plugging a brand as a sponsor and it gets so long before you even get into the podcast.

Speaker 1:

And it's up to you how you want to structure your podcast Like listen to the podcast you enjoy and take notes of what you like about them. For example, some podcasts start with this week's episode we're talking about blah blah, blah, blah blah and then it goes into the song and the intro and then it goes into the podcast. Ours starts with the song and the intro and then we walk into the podcast explaining everything from there. So there's no formula that you have to stay by. You just need to go by what you think is right for your podcast.

Speaker 2:

And so with your intro music, you want a little bit of music to keep it fun and exciting. But just be really careful. You have to use royalty-free music. You can't go and use your favorite Taylor Swift song or anything like that so you can Google royalty-free podcast intro music. There's lots of stuff on the internet. Just making sure that it's, yeah, royalty free, you're not going to get in trouble for you know any copyright breaches. So pick something that you like and that probably doesn't have any lyrics in it, I would say, because you're going to be talking over the top and fading in and out and just a nice, cool, funky beat that is, yeah, catchy and is going to be memorable to you. And then, like Kristen said, you can just go into audacity garage band and sort of edit that music with your intro and sort of fade it over the top, um, and just save that as a folder so you can just pop it in at the start and then maybe you can use that music at the end of your podcast too, as it fades out.

Speaker 1:

You end up using that music over and over again and it becomes like, oh, I know that podcast. Oh, like, people get to know it. So again, you're building brand trust and that's what creating a podcast is all about. So you don't want to chop and change all the time, Like, yes, test a few and maybe you do one and you're like, oh, I don't like that your song. And then I'll randomly, you know the podcast, I have them all. When you open your podcast app and it comes up and sometimes I'll click on it I'm like oh, and I'm like oh, that's our song, you got to get used to it.

Speaker 1:

So, and look, have fun when you're recording it. Look, it's sometimes a bit more difficult when it's you on your own. But I know when Mia and I recorded the intro, we did about I don't know, it felt like about 20 different takes and then the end, we just had a blast creating it. We were laughing and that's why the ending of our podcast is pretty random, because we said some random shit, as we always do, and it just made sense to us and our audience and who we are as people and content creators that nothing's perfect. So that suited us really well. So I would highly, I think me and I would really say to you all like, if you're thinking of doing it like, do hundreds of versions, have some fun with it, fuck it up like whatever, and then find the best version to put to your music, which yet audacity garage band, pop it in there and go for it.

Speaker 2:

Just have fun with it, because, yeah, put your personality into it, like it doesn't have to be perfect and you know, just have fun with it. And people they're going to appreciate that if it's not highly polished and you're just, you know, with this monotone saying word for word on some script, just, yeah, have fun with it, have lots of goes and yeah, pick the best one that you think will stick. And I mean I guess if, if you choose something and you get over it, you can always change it in the future.

Speaker 1:

Um, but, yeah, have fun with it, and so the next part that sometimes confuses people is all right, so I've recorded my podcast. It's absolutely amazing how the fuck is the world gonna hear it like? Are they just gonna like?

Speaker 2:

just call apple podcast and be like yo I got a podcast, I remember I remember thinking when I first I'm like what so anyone can just have like an Apple podcast, like just anyone. I thought you had to be, you know, someone special.

Speaker 1:

I mean, you do, mia, you do? No, you absolutely don't. Anybody can be one, and there's a few different things. To get yourself into the Apple podcast, well, not just Apple, any podcast space, it doesn't have to be Apple podcast at all, but one of those I know. When I first started again with my very first podcast, the Secret Brides Club, I recorded that purely on a platform called Anchor. Now, anchor was free at the time, was a phone app, was bloody awesome. That's now owned by Spotify and apparently it's still free. There's still a free option of it.

Speaker 1:

So I don't know too much about that. But basically what, when you're talking hosting and platforms, you've got your podcast and then in order for your podcast to get out all the time and have what's called an RSS code, like once you've created the podcast and you upload it into a platform like if it's Anchor, that's free anyway it's going to give you a code and that is an RSS code and basically that code. Then when you copy that code and put it into another platform or your website, that's what finds us, basically what identifies and finds your podcast in the world of podcasts, right. So that's the most important code that you will get generated once you get onto these hosting platforms. So you've got your podcast, then you need to put it onto a hosting platform, so we'll just list a couple. There's lots. You can Google, search them all. You can YouTube, do whatever you want. We're just listing the few that like the top five ones that we've potentially used in the past, ones that we know work quite well.

Speaker 1:

So, like I said, anchor is now owned by Spotify, but I'm pretty sure it's still called Anchor. That is a free platform and nothing wrong with that. The only thing that I will say about the free platform do your research in the terms and conditions around. If you go for a free option, what does that mean? A when I decide, okay, shit, this is working, like, I'm loving this, this is great, I want to invest now, what does that mean? Does that mean I think for maybe Buzzsprout or one of those that if you go a free option, there's only so many days I think it's like 90 days your podcast stays on that platform before it uploads a new one.

Speaker 1:

So there's just a few little cheeky terms and conditions to be aware of on the free platforms is what I'm saying.

Speaker 2:

I don't know them exactly because I'm probably a bit at a point to make is to actually save your podcast away in a Google Drive or something because of that, because, yeah, they disappear and you're like, oh shit, my podcasts are just gone now. So, yeah, keep them stored away.

Speaker 1:

And also you know when you do that, the way that we do it, which you could do if you want is in the Google Drive. Each podcast has a folder. So inside that folder is the podcast, the social media, the video files, the clips, any kind of information around that podcast, the blog, all of that is in a folder. So every time we need anything about that episode it's all there. So keeping those things all together and naming that folder, the podcast number and name just a little hot tip on the side.

Speaker 1:

So the other hosting platforms Libsyn it's a good one. Podbean very good, very well known. Anchor Transistor haven't used that. I haven't actually heard of that one. I was Googling and that one came up as like one of the top five. And Captivate I've used Captivate Very, very good, is probably on the pricier side, but a good platform.

Speaker 1:

We use Buzzsprout. Now we've had. I've really enjoyed using Buzzsprout. I must admit there's been. No, that's a paid platform, I think it's $12 to $18 a month depending on how many hours of podcasting you put on there and so forth. Again, all those terms and conditions to look at. We have an affiliate link to Buzzsprout. If you would like to join up with that particular platform. It's all in the little show notes stuff. The one thing that is good with something like Buzzsprout, for example we can talk about it because we use it is when we upload our podcast. We are now paying an extra $10 a month because what it does is you upload the podcast and it does its AI technology to make the sound quality a perfection and then, once it's done that, then it's got something called an AI co-host. Now, at first, mira and I were like oh mate, we just seem to be paying for more and more stuff is it worth it, I know, and I was like, let's just try it for a month.

Speaker 1:

And so we did that and the AI co-host wrote our show notes, gave us suggestion titles, gave us sections, so it breaks up the podcast in sections to say like what different section or what timer transcription, a blog post and then social and then social media snippets.

Speaker 1:

So I was like, um, this is worth ten dollars a month absolutely yes, it's like a mini virtual assistant in a buzzsprout yeah, because we had like this whole process written up that like you take that from there and then you can go to chat gT and let chat GPT know what the subject of that particular podcast was about, to write the show notes, and then check the show notes to make sure they're on brand with you, and then from that show notes then you write the blog post with the help from chat GPT and if that's not right, like there was this fucking process and I was like um, that is more than $10 of time.

Speaker 1:

So now we get that all done, we read it all and go, yeah, that's pretty on point and we change it or we add anything that we want to. But because the AI co-host is basically the AI has listened to the whole thing. It knows exactly what the blog post needs to be and what the show notes need to be. So we often add a little bit to sound a bit more like us. But time saved, money saved, so that's a huge, huge win, huge win.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and we've had no issues with Blood Sprout, no technical issues, no glitches, nothing like that. So, yeah, it's been really good.

Speaker 1:

And that's going to give you your analytics and stuff like that as well, and basically it kind of hosts it on a website there. The other thing that these hosting platforms do do is they help to publish your different Spotify, apple there's so many I can't even think of them now. There's a list of like 20 different places Google podcast I don't think they're actually shutting down Google podcast. I saw an email the other day or changing the platform or something. But by doing that inside Buzzsprout, you basically just go to the page of Buzzsprout and just click all the ones that you want to connect to and it's like it just does it connectss it all, and you can also embed it into your website as well, like on our website.

Speaker 2:

We've got a podcasting page and you just embed you know Buzzsprout's code onto that and then all of a sudden you've got this hosted podcast on your website as well.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, the only thing with Apple Podcasts I know is you have to go to Apple Podcasts Connect. That is the only random thing that's going to connect you to Apple Podcasts. You can either just Google Apple Podcasts Connect and that'll talk you through the whole process. You need the iTunes account. Or once you get into something like Buzzsprout, you'll click on I want to connect to Apple Podcasts and it'll send you through that process anyway. So that's the only one that's probably a little left of centre, where the rest is like click for Spotify and it's like you're now connected. Click for here, you're now connected. Apple's always a little different, don't they, I know? So make sure you have your Apple podcast passwords, no Apple iTunes password, because that always gets everyone like I don't know, I signed up like a thousand years ago.

Speaker 2:

You sort of want to be on Apple Podcasts, because I listen to all my podcasts on Apple, because it's just there. I don't have to download another app. I don't have the Spotify app or anything like that.

Speaker 1:

So, yeah, a lot of people are going to be listening on Apple. So the other things that we probably haven't touched on but are worth thinking about too is creating your thumbnails for the podcast, creating the artwork for that. So simple enough, you can go into Canva even the free Canva accounts type in podcast. It'll come up with a whole gamut of different ideas and designs you can use. The best advice we can give is make the title very bold and very big, like you got to go to your Apple podcast and look at the size. That is the size people are looking at, so you want to stand out.

Speaker 1:

So if you go in there, beige and bland and soft, you'll just blend in the background. So you know, with ours is bright yellow and you know we've got a lot of pink, we've got a lot of bright colors in our logo. But you know we went with pink and then we were looking through and we're like there's lots of pink, there's not very many bright yellow. So we went with that in the thought of like, okay, at least when, least, when people see that again it's that instant like, oh, that's I am dot podcast or whatever.

Speaker 2:

Put a photo of yourself as well too, because people want to put a face to the podcast. So, yeah, definitely put a photo of yourself on there as well.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and so, with anything, go and just consume, look like what catches your eye, because that's what catches people's eye, and don't put too much text on there. You don't need too much text. You just need the name and the podcast name and maybe who it's by, and that's it. Don't go over the top with design. So that's the other part, and you can upload all of those images through the hosting platforms like buzzsprout or whichever one you choose to go with. So then from there, mia, in terms of launching podcast, we launched it a bit differently to some people that might just like go okay, I've done it, I'm just going to start. So should we talk people through how we launched it and why?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so we created a little bit of a hype around it. So, before you just go and put your podcast out to the world and then you find that no one listens to it and your heart breaks, you're like, oh, no one cares, create some hype on social media, tell people what you're doing, tell people that you're working towards something. You know we had emails, launch emails, like all listed out and you know we were telling people that we're creating this podcast, what we're doing, what was it going to be about. And just let people know what you're doing before you actually go and do it, cause the minute that you launch it and you know you can launch it to your email list, to your social media, however you want to do it. But just creating that bit of hype will get you those, you know, a bit of a spike in your views at the beginning, which is going to help your confidence.

Speaker 2:

And, yeah, putting it out to the world on day one is, yeah, probably not the best way to do it, and we actually recorded was it three or five episodes to begin with, before we actually put it out to the world? Yeah, I know that's important too, because if people just listen to one and there's nothing else to listen to after that. They're going to be a little bit, you know, let down. But if it's binge-worthy type podcasts, they're going to be a little bit, you know, let down. But if it's binge-worthy type podcasts, they're going to want to listen to a few in a row, like I binge podcasts all the time if I love it. So, yeah, definitely record a few before you go and launch it to the world as well.

Speaker 1:

Best practice in terms of what I've certainly discovered in my time listening to other podcasts and other people that do podcasts really well is, like Mia said, we did, I think, five episodes that we pre-recorded. So that meant that that first week we launched, we launched three. One was like Monday, wednesday, friday, and that's to like hit your audience hard with that whole, like they want to consume this is fresh, they're excited. You hit them with that and then every week from then on, the aim of the game is to podcast same day, same time. Now, that's not always possible and I appreciate that, but if you can do that again you're building trust and consistency with your audience and they will know when you don't turn up.

Speaker 1:

And this is something that I think even Mia and I kind of were like oh yeah, I mean, I've always believed it because I'm mad, for there's a few podcasts that I live by and I know the days they're coming out and if they're not out or it's not quite, I'm like, oh, this is fucking annoying, like I love this, like this is what I look forward to. So that's where you want your audience to be. You want them to be at that point where they open their phone, like, oh sweet, like we do ours Monday morning, because like, okay, people are getting into their week, we want to hit them with that bit of energy and excitement.

Speaker 1:

So you kind of want people to be like, yeah, driving to work, doing whatever, dropping the kids off, starting their week, and so you want to hit people with that and have them like waiting for it. So doing the same time is part of building trust and consistency.

Speaker 2:

And like we're mums, like we're busy mums and we get it. So sometimes if we know your school holidays are coming up or we've got stuff on, we'll record two or three episodes in one week. So we know for the next three weeks there's one going to be coming out Monday morning, without fail that you've got that busy period and you think you know what I'm just going to do a 10, 20-minute something.

Speaker 1:

Just get something out. That's fine. They don't all have to be hours and hours and hours worth. It could just be small, short snippets, and that's fine too. You decide what you want to give your audience and they'll be the ones like great, I know what I'm getting each and every week, or this is the kind of podcast I enjoy. So keep that in mind as you build your podcast.

Speaker 2:

And so when you're putting your podcast out there, it's really important to keep talking about it, cause you want people to discover your podcast. It's not often that you'll sit in Apple iTunes scrolling all the podcasts just looking for something random to listen to. You'll generally see something on social media or you know you might find something through Pinterest or YouTube. So really leverage your social media. I mean we talk about whenever our podcast drops. On Monday, we'll do an Instagram story. We'll, you know, put our little clips of it out on TikTok and Instagram just to let people know that we've got a podcast, and then it's. A new episode is out every week. And don't forget to use your email list as well. If you've got an email list, when the podcast drops, send them out an automated email Monday morning. Here's our new podcast, here's a link to it. So you're just reminding people that you know you've got this podcast.

Speaker 2:

And what we do as well, which is fantastic, is collaborating with other creators. Get them on your podcast or go on other people's podcasts, because you're accessing their audience as well. You're finding new people to discover you. So collaborating and being guest speakers on podcasts is amazing, and then generally they'll link to all of your stuff in their podcast and vice versa. You can link to all their stuff in your podcast as well. So really put yourself out there and get on other people's podcasts and just ask. All I can do is say no. If there's someone that you really admire and that you'd love on your podcast, just ask them. And a lot of the times they're going to say yes because they want their stuff to be out there as well. So yeah, yeah, that's right.

Speaker 1:

So we're going to kind of wrap it up there because it's it sounds like a lot of work and you're probably like cool, at the start of this episode I was going to start a podcast and now I don't want to, but we just wanted to kind of let you in on the process. That is very simple and it's something that, if you just take that messy action and start the process, each step is pretty simple, pretty clear, and then all of a sudden you've got a podcast and then you can start refining it, growing it, doing whatever that you want with it once you kind of get there. So first things first is the planning, your podcast. So get that ideal customer, nail your niche, get totally across who it is that you are talking to, the problem you're solving and why you want to do this podcast in the first place would be where you want to start the equipment and the software. So choosing the right equipment, microphones, all those things, getting them all set up to start with, and not over analyzing and procrastinating, but starting somewhere Then it's time to record it. So once you've actually kind of got everything, you've got that software, start recording, create the intro, get the music, get it all set up and going, so that you have something that you've created and then you start to find your hosting platform, which we've outlined.

Speaker 1:

Those hosting platforms that you could choose from. They're pretty simple to set up, they're pretty easy to use, they're very self-explanatory. Once that's up and running, then it's just you talking about it to your audience and promoting it and hitting go. So that kind of simplifies what was quite a long podcast about podcasting, but it simplified a process that isn't that hard. You've just got to have that.

Speaker 1:

Forget the fear of failure, forget the what if this doesn't work? What if no one listens? If no one listens, then no one knows. But what if, like, thousands of people listen and you realize that, holy shit, I love this. Now I don't have to spend all my time on social media, where 4% of people see it and no one gives a shit, where now you actually get to speak to people about stuff that you love, build trust with them and build your audience, which is, in turn, is going to build your business and get those people to know, like and trust phase, way quicker than any 30 second reel or what now, five second reel or one minute TikTok or something like that. So keep that in mind.

Speaker 2:

Exactly and link all of your offers in the show notes and let people know about it, talk about it and you know, down the track you know you can look at sponsorships and pitching to brands and they'll sponsor your podcast and all that sort of stuff that happens down the track. But we love podcasting, highly recommend it and we're going to link below a checklist for you to make it easy. Simplified checklist so it's not so overwhelming. So we'll put that in the show notes as well. But yeah, that's, that's podcasting and we love it.

Speaker 1:

I wish I did it two years ago, I know, but then you wouldn't have been chatting to me and I wouldn't have been chatting to you, and you know. But we've started this rocky, wonderful rollercoaster. It's bloody great, all right. So, mia, what are your loves and don't loves for this week?

Speaker 2:

And just before we go into that, this is another thing that we do at the end of every podcast that you might like to do on yours as well is something that you do every single week. That is just something, something, something to you know, show your personality a bit more, talk about something different than the topics that you're talking about. So every week we do our loves and don't loves. It. Just you know, it shows more of us. So this week, for my don't loves is the legal stuff in business. Now we've had lawyer Ange on the podcast last week and as much as I don't like all the legal stuff in business and you know, not to scare people away from business, it's a bit of a pain in the butt but having someone like Ange in this space has been awesome. She's so approachable. If you haven't listened to her podcast that we did it was last week, wasn't it Go?

Speaker 2:

and check it out and consume all Ange's stuff. She makes it a little less overwhelming, but yeah, don't love the legals in business. My loves this week, which I know you're not going to love this because we've had this conversation. Yeah you're not convincing me, but please convince the crowd. Let us know on socials. Just give us a DM if you love this Period discs. I'm a fan. I'm a fan. I used to use the cup, the menstrual cup, and now I discovered the disc. It's a bloody game changer. Just try it.

Speaker 1:

I swear, can I be gross and tell you to explain it, because I'm kind of like I just go look, just give me a tampon, I'm just here for it.

Speaker 2:

I don't up feel the need. We might have men listening to the podcast too.

Speaker 1:

I don't care. Well, welcome, because we all have this and it's heaps of fun.

Speaker 2:

So people probably know about a menstrual cup. So it's this cup that you put in the hoo-ha during your menstruation and you can leave it in there for 12 hours and it just collects all the stuff and then you jump in the shower and you empty it. So it's 12 hours and the disc is similar, but it's easier. It collects more. It's yeah, go and have a search about it, but it's been a game changer. Like you can leave it in all night, it doesn't leak. You know, you don't have to buy anything every month. Good for the environment, yada, yada, yada. It's honestly, just buy one and try one, you'll, you won't go back. I know the thought of it seems gross, but you're just doing the shower.

Speaker 1:

It's fine, like it's not, it's not even gross, it's just the whole like putting it in there and like how do you see that with a tampon as well yeah, but it's like pointy, like it's it's, it's good for a hole. Everything else is like flat and I can't look like it's like for a hole. Everything else is like flat. I'm like how's a fucking.

Speaker 2:

You've folded up A round hole?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, but what if you get the fold wrong and all of a sudden she's Lucy Leaky or something? Lucy Leaky Sorry to all the Lucys, you're not Leaky.

Speaker 2:

Just go have a YouTube and you'll see the anatomy and how it all works. Oh, you're such a nurse and if you're like, scared about leakage and all that sort of stuff, get yourself from period undies as well.

Speaker 1:

Um, I'm not doubling up mate just in case. Being a woman is so fun oh, yeah, it's.

Speaker 2:

Anyway, that's my love for this week, and I wish I knew about it when I was 14 years old. So there you go.

Speaker 1:

Try it and come back to me Maybe. All right, I'm going to put a maybe. Okay, all right, it's not a no, it's not a yes, it's a maybe Because, as I have a daughter, I feel like I need to make sure that I have these things ready for her. She's five, so I've got some time, although, according to some mothers, I don't considering what's going on. But that is a podcast topic for another day.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, maybe we'll do a podcast on that. No, just yeah, if I hadn't known about these when I was 13 years old, 14, whenever it was yep game changer Noted. Right, thanks for that. All right, what's your don't loves?

Speaker 1:

and loves. Maybe your don't loves. Look, period. I'm no, look, I'm not against it. I've just never tried it and it's something that I'm like. I just I know what I know goes in, comes out, I'm good. Anyway, enough about that. My loves don't love. Don't love this week. I'm gonna change it after today's situation. It started with the algorithm. I don't want to talk about that. Gonna change it after today's situation. It started with the algorithm. I don't want to talk about that. I want to talk about telstra and telstra. If you're listening, you know what you can go and do a big bag of what.

Speaker 1:

But yeah, oh, my god, like, just don't even start me on how, in 2024, the internet just doesn't work, just nah. Telstra's like, hey guys, guys, we're like so good for small business. I'm like cool, have all my money because we run two small businesses from this. And then they're like, hey, now I've got your money, it doesn't work. Um, and when you complain, oh, we don't care and can you pay a bill. Great, it's massive. Um, cool, I just, I just have had a gutso with.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I actually saw aok recently. Uh, this guy from the us came to australia and he was saying all the things that he's noticed about australia and one of them was bad wi-fi. He's like it's terrible here even right now, yeah, even right now.

Speaker 1:

It's like uploading paused. Nah, I'm having a hot spot for my phone. After the Netgear thing, the $800, $900 thing I bought that, I was like, nah, this is cool. The lady's like this is what you want to do. So Telstra is on the don't love list and watch out. The phone call after is not going to be nice. Also, if you're listening to this podcast, yeah, listen up, buckle up.

Speaker 1:

So my loves for this week. Mia knows this is probably never going to happen again, but I want to share with you all that I became a food prepper Such a wanker For one week, for one week. And so on Sunday, went food shopping and was like, okay, I'm just going to be the best wife and mother going around town. So I did like the food prep boiled some chicken breasts and shredded them for lunches and like, cut some veggies so that when it came to dinner I could just get them all out of the container, bought some new containers. I was like, oh, I'm out of control. Look, the high side of this is every day I have had a little bowl of nuts for my snacks, I've had chicken sandwich. I can just go and create like it's been fantastic. I've made the kids lunches, my husband's lunch, every night because he started a new job and I was like prep, all that. I'm like mate, I'm kicking life goals, knowing full well that this might be the last week I ever do it never know, don't doubt yourself.

Speaker 2:

But I'm just like no, that's not gonna last, and I am so aware.

Speaker 1:

I am and this is where I don't have ADHD. I've never checked, pretty sure I do Whatever but this is where I know that I've got something going on in my spicy brain is because I also, at the start of every year, buy a journal and I'm like this year, this year, I'm going to write everything in my journal and then, february 16, no, I don't even know where the journal is, not even journal. The calendar, the diary, not even journal diary. Like sorry, no, I don't know where it is, don't care. So yeah, food prepping, it's been great. I hope to continue. Stay tuned, cheer me on, let me know if you think I can continue or not.

Speaker 2:

I'm happy to take bets on it. Next week I'm going to ask you again and again. But no, like it's. Yeah, it makes sense, and I mean it's great for people that you know health conscious and want to lose weight and all that sort of stuff. But I know for myself, I mean you might be different. I know I just comes to Sunday and I'm like, oh fuck, I can't be bothered to go to Woolies today. I'll do it tomorrow and then the whole week's, just yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I don't know. It's one of those things that, like, I've looked at our week and gone like, okay, we're getting lots of work done, but if I that means I did the shopping on Monday, then we miss out on that. So I'm like, okay, so Sunday anyway. Look, I'm really happy with the way it's gone this week and I'm hoping to continue it All right, this has been a really long podcast.

Speaker 2:

We have podcasting. Like I said, everything's going to be in the show notes, the checklist. We're doing a master's class inside the membership as well, so we'll have some extra goodies in there. But yeah, we highly recommend it. And you know what's the worst that can happen if you start.

Speaker 1:

No one listens, and then you stop or you start and you blow the socks off it. That would be great. All right, we're tapping out.

Speaker 2:

Bye, bye, check the podcast.

Speaker 1:

We've got so many good ones too.

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